USING “WINDOWS 7

 

 

WHAT HAPPENED TO "PRINTERS AND FAXES"?

 

In "Windows 7", the items that used to reside in "Printers and Faxes" are now part of "Devices and Printers":

Click on the Windows "Start" button.

Then click on "Devices and Printers" on the right-most column of the two-column "Start Menu".

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When you right click on a printer icon, you now have two "Properties" selections in the popup context menu:

 

 

 

 

 

The popup context menu looks like this:

 

 

The bottom-most "Properties" selection is now useless. If you click on it, you will see this non-descript Window:

 

The "Printer properties" is the one that has the useful printer settings and utilities/applets in it. If you click on "Printer properties":

 

You will get the printer settings and utilities that you used to get by clicking on "Properties" in the versions of Windows prior to "Windows 7", including a "Print Test Page" button. The tabs that you see will different between which printer model you have but you will always get tabs for:

General

Sharing

and

Ports

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THREE DEFAULT PINNED ICONS ON THE "WINDOWS 7" TASKBAR

 

By default "Windows 7" has no "Quick Launch" bar: It has been replaced by "pinning" to the Taskbar.

"Pinning" means that you can put a menu-ed button for any executable application program onto either the "Taskbar" or the top-most section of the left side of the "Start Menu".

 

By default, three icons are "pinned" to the Windows 7 "Taskbar":

"Internet Explorer", "Windows Explorer", and "Windows Media Player".

If you want to get rid one of them, right click on it and select "Unpin this program from taskbar" from the pop-up utility menu.

 

 

 

 

 

WHAT HAPPENED TO "NETWORK"

         OR "MY NETWORK PLACES?

 

To get to files, folders, and printers that are out on your local area network, you now have to use "Windows Explorer".

This will be a change for you if you are used to clicking on "Network" on the Windows Vista "Start Menu" or if you are used to clicking on "My Network Places" on the Windows XP "Start Menu".

Both of these earlier versions of Windows allowed you to reach objects on the local network area network from "Windows Explorer", but in "Windows 7" you have to use "Windows Explorer".

 

There are three methods to start "Windows Explorer" in "Windows 7":

 

 

METHOD 1:

Click on the "Windows Explorer" icon that is pinned by default to the "Task bar":

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METHOD 2:

Click on the Windows "Start" button.

Then click on "Computer".

 

 

METHOD 3:

Click on the Windows "Start menu".

Type "Windows Explorer" into the search box.

Press the <Enter> key of your keyboard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TASK BUTTONS ON TASK BAR ARE STACKED

AS A DEFAULT IN "WINDOWS 7"

 

By default, the "Task buttons" on your "Task bar" are in "Always combine, hide labels" mode.

 

To change this:

Rright click on the "Task bar".

Click on "Properties" on the popup context menu.

Change the "Taskbar buttons" dropdown list arrow to the desired selection:

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Finally, click on the "OK" button.

 

 

 

 

 

LOOK FOR THE FRAME(S) TO DETERMINE IF A PINNED ICON REPRESENTS AN OPEN WINDOW

 

 

If you leave "Task buttons" in the "Always combine, hide labels" mode, then the only way you can tell if a "Pinned icon" on the "Task bar" is by looking for a frame around it.

 

If you do not see a frame around it, then it does not represent any open         windows.

If you see a single frame around it, then it represents a single open         window.

If you see 2 frames around it, then it represents 2 open windows.

If you see 3 frames around it, then it represents 3 open windows

 

If you hover your mouse cursor over a pinned icon, it will display the         names of all open windows that it represents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OPENING ADDITIONAL WINDOWS:

 

Opening additional windows is much easier than in earlier versions of Windows.

For most "task buttons" that are on the "Task bar", you can open additional windows by either:

Method 1:

Holding down the shift key and using the LEFT mouse button to click on the "task button"

OR

Method 2:

Using the RIGHT mouse button to click on the "task button" and then clicking on the name of the application on the popup context menu.

 

Some of your more RAM-intensive software applications might not allow you to open additional Windows in this manner:

For example, Adobe "Dreamweaver" will not allow you to open any additional Windows.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SNIPPING TOOL

 

The new Windows 7 "Snipping Tool" has many of the features of the "SnagIt" utility.

It lets you create a graphic file out of anything that you see on your computer's monitor.

 

To get to it, click on "Start" button, "All Programs", and then "Accessories".

 

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It's "Options" menu is as follows:

 

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*

 

 

 

 

 

"WINDOWS DISC IMAGE BURNER"

 

The bundled "Windows Disc Image Burner" in "Windows 7" does a great job of burning DVDs and CDs from ISO 9660 files. ISO 9660 files are also known as "ISO files".

The executable file for "Windows Disk Image Burner" is isoburn.exe.

It is located in C:\Windows\System32\

 

To use the "Windows Disk Image Burner", follow the step-by-step instructions at

http://windowsteamblog.com/blogs/windowsexperience/archive/2009/04/13/burn-iso-images-natively-in-windows-7.aspx

 

"Windows Disk Image Burner" does not allow you to make or edit ISO files. It just lets you make DVDs and CDs from existing ISO files.

 

 

 

 

 

 

"WINDOWS FAX" IS BACK !

 

The fax services that were not available in the "Home" versions of "Windows Vista" are now back in all versions of "Windows 7".  In "Windows 7", it is called "Windows Fax and Scan". It installs automatically when you do any type of installation of any version of "Windows 7".

 

To start up this application, click on the "Start" button. Next, click on "All Programs". Finally, click on "Windows Fax and Scan".

 

It looks like this:

 

Step-by-step instructions on how to use it are located at

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/products/features/windows-fax-and-scan

 

Also, in "Windows 7", the Fax printer automatically shows up in "Devices and Printers", you do not have to manually "install" it like you had to in "Windows Vista" and "Windows XP":

 

 

Liz and I have been successfully using it to send and receive faxes.  We love it !

 

 

 

 

 

 

"PROBLEM STEPS RECORDER"

 

If you want to create a documentation document that describes how to perform any series of steps in Windows, you can use the new "Problem Steps Recorder":

 

Click on the Windows "Start button".

Type in

   psr

Hit the <Enter> key of your keyboard.

 

The "Problem Steps Recorder" toolbar will be displayed:

 

Click on the triangular-shaped button at its lower right hand corner.

Click on "Settngs" on the pulldown menu:

A "Problem Steps Recorder Settings" box will be displayed.

 

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*

Change the "Number of recent screen captures to store:" to 99:

*

*

 

 

Click on the "OK" button.

*

The "Problem Steps Recorder Settings" dialog box will disappear.

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*

To start a recording, click on the "Start Record" button.

Then, minimize the "Problem Steps Recorder" toolbar to get it out of the way.

Then, start doing whatever you want recorded.

Since the "Problem Steps Recorder" makes screenshots of your entire screen, you will get better screenshots if you maximize all Windows that you are using before you start using them.

When you are done with the steps that you wish to record, restore the "Problem Steps Recorder" toolbar.

Then, click on its "Stop Record" button.

A "Save As" dialog box will be displayed:

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Work your way to where you want to store your problem steps file:

In my example, I chose the Windows "Desktop", since it is a easy location of find things.

Then type in a "File name":

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In this example, I typed in

Instruction for Using Windows Disc Image Burner applet.

Click on the "Save" button.

Click on the "X" button in the upper right-hand corner of the "Problem Steps Recorder" toolbar to close it out.

In this example, the file that is created is called

"Instruction for Using Windows Disc Image Burner applet.zip"

If you then double-click on this zip file, you will find inside it with a name similar to

"Problem_20100309_1344.mht"

Drag this file to somewhere on a hard drive of your computer.

Rename this file to whether you want to call it.

It this example, I renamed it to

Instruction for Using Windows Disc Image Burner applet.mht

To view and/or edit this file, right click on it and click on "Open with" from the context menu.

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*

Click on the "+" icon on the right side of the "Open with" dialog box.

*

*

 

Remove the checkmark from "Always use the selected program to open this kind of file:

*

 

*

Double-click "Microsoft Word" in the "Other Programs" section:

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*

The mht file will open up in "Microsoft Word":

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*

Do a "File" and a "Save As.." to convert this file to a *.doc file:

 

*

 

Select the desired "Save as type".

 

Click on the "Save" button.

 

 

Click on "Continue" if you get a "Microsoft Word Compatibility Checker" windows.

 

You will now be viewing and editing a *.doc file.

In my example, my Word .doc file is called

Instruction for Using Windows Disc Image Burner applet

         

 

 

DRAGGING AND DROPPING FILES AND FOLDERS:

 

 

In a manner similar to "Windows XP" and "Windows Vista", every Windows Explorer button has a "Change your view" button". In "Windows 7", it is near the upper right hand corner. Click the downward pointing triangular button to the right of it to change your view. (If you click the actual "Change you view" button, it steps you through all of the different views that are available, which is similar to "Windows Vista" and different from "Windows XP".)

 

When you are in "Details" view, "Windows 7" does not give you enough white space to drop a file or folder in between two existing folders (unlike earlier versions of Windows).

 

To get around this problem, here are some suggestions:

 

When dragging and dropping files and folders from one location to another, use the right mouse button if you want to be sure as to whether you moving or copying, since using the right mouse button gives you a popup context menu to tell you the default operation and to let you select between copying or moving:

 

When dragging and dropping files and folders from one location to another, do not inadvertently drop into an unintended folder:

 

If a folder highlights during the drag and drop process, that is where your dragged object will end up.

 

To make sure that you do not drag and drop into an unintended folder in the "file list" area, drag and drop into one of these other locations of a target window:

 

White space between or below folders in the "file list" area

or

The title bar at the top of the window,

or

the address bar

or

the horizontal scroll bar, if there is one

or

the right-most vertical scroll bar, if there is one

(not the left-most vertical scroll bar)

or

the bottom status bar, if there is one

or

the preview area, if there is one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIBRARIES

 

Libraries are described in

http://windowsteamblog.com/blogs/developers/archive/2009/04/06/understanding-windows-7-libraries.aspx

 

and in

 

http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/windows-7-libraries-%E2%80%93-and-why-you-want-them/

 

Libraries are virtual folders where your actions result in real actions inside the actual folders where files are located.

 

Libraries have a "library header" with the word "Library" in them.

 

 

This "library header" is located immediately above the right-most list of files and folders.

 

To find out what folders the library "represents" click on the word "locations" in the library header. Once inside the "locations" configuration box, you can add and remove actual hard drive folders to a library. When performing "adds" and "removes" in the "locations" configuration box, you are not actually creating new folders or removing actual folders--you are just deciding which hard drive folders to show inside the library. Once you leave the "locations" configuration box, and start working within the actual library, any changes you make to files and folders that are displayed inside the "library" become real changes in the folder locations that are represented by the library.

 

Libraries are not real folders on the hard drive of your computer.

 

Libraries are "defined" at

C:\Users\your username\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Libraries

 

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*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you right click on the "Documents" library, click on "Properties", and then click on the "Details" tab, you will discover that it is "defined" by a file called

"Documents.library-ms

 

 

This file defines the library.

 

 

 

"START MENU" CHANGES IN "WINDOWS 7"

 

Unlike "Windows XP" and "Windows Vista", "Windows 7" does not give you the option of having a single-column "Classic Start Menu" so you are stuck with the more modern dual-column menu (unless you run "csmenu", a free software application that you can obtain from http://www.csmenu.com

But Liz and I recommend that you use the newer two-column "Start Menu" which has been optionally available since "Windows XP".)

The left column of the Windows 7 "Start Menu" is similar to the left column of the "Start Menu" in "Windows XP" and "Windows Vista":

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"ALL PROGRAMS" SECTION OF "START MENU"

 

The bottom-most section of the left column of the Start Menu is the "All Programs" item.

Clicking on "All Programs" provides you with a list of all application programs that are "registered" with the "Registry" of "Windows 7". 

 

 

 

"PINNED LIST" SECTION OF "START MENU"

 

The topmost section of the left column of the "Start Menu" is now called the "pinned list" in Microsoft documentation.

 

The topmost section of the left column of the "Start Menu" is for two types of shortcuts:

"shortcuts" to document files (that the user creates by dragging a document file to the "Start" button)

 

 

 

 

"RECENTLY OPENED PROGRAMS" SECTION

OF "START MENU"

 

The middle section of the left column of the "Start Menu" is for "pinned" executable application programs (that have been "pinned" there by you).

If you have not created any "shortcuts" to document files or "pinned" executable application programs, then this top section of the left side of the "Start Menu" will not exist--this section cannot be blank.

 

 

The middle section of the left column of the "Start Menu" is for "recently opened programs". The shortcuts in this section change, depending on what programs you have been running.

 

 

 

 

BROWNISH ORANGE BARS

 

After you install a new program into your computer, the entry for the program in both the "recently used programs" and "All Programs" sections of the "Start Menu" will have a brownish orange bar through it for a while:

*

 

After you run any part of a newly-installed program, the "Recent" section of the left side of your "Start Menu" will show some parts of the newly-installed program with a brownish orange bar:

 

Don't get excited about these brownish orange bars !  They will go away eventually.

 

 

 

 

 

"AERO" ENHANCEMENTS

 

The "Aero" features of "Windows Vista" have been enhanced in "Windows 7":

"Windows 7" has the following three "gee wiz" features:

Aero Snap,

Aero Shake,

and

Aero Peek

 

 

"AERO SNAP"

 

"Aero Snap" is sometimes just called "Snap" at the Microsoft Web site.

See

http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windows-7/features/snap.aspx?tabid=2&catid=3

 

If you drag the whole title bar of the active window to the top of the screen, the active window will maximize.

If you then drag the title bar of the active window downward and away from the top of the screen, the active window will restore to its original size.

 

If you drag the top-most edge of the title bar of the active window to the top of the screen, the active window will maximize vertically but stay the same size horizontally.

If you then drag the top-most edge of the title bar of the active back down below the top of the screen, vertical height of the active window will restore its original size and position.

 

If you drag the whole title bar of the active window to the right-most edge of the screen, the right-most edge of the active Window will maximize vertically and align itself with the entire right edge of the screen. The width of the active window will be roughly half the total width of the screen.

If you then drag the whole title bar of the active window to the left, away from the right side of the screen, the original size and location of the active window will be restored.

 

 

 

 

 

"AERO SHAKE"

 

"Aero Shake" is sometimes just called "Shake" at the Microsoft Web site.

If you use the mouse cursor to shake the title bar of the active window from side to side, then all other windows that are currently open on the Desktop will minimize.

 

If you then do the same thing again, all other Windows on the Desktop will reappear in the normal positions and sizes.

 

See

http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windows-7/features/aero-shake.aspx?tabid=1&catid=4

 

 

 

 

 

 

"AERO PEEK"

 

"Aero Peek" is also called "Peek" at the Microsoft Web site.

"Aero Peek" consists of two features:

 "Peek at the Desktop"

and

"Peek at an open file on the Desktop".

See

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/Whats-new-with-the-Windows-desktop

 

 

 

"PEEK AT THE DESKTOP"

 

The "Show Desktop" button is now at the far right end of the Windows "Taskbar". It is to the right of the "Notification Area" (which is also known as the "System Tray").

If you click on this rectangular button, you will minimize all open windows.

If you then click on this rectangular button, all open windows will return to their original sizes and locations on the Windows "Desktop". In this way, the newly-relocated "Show Desktop" button acts just like the "show Desktop" button in "Windows XP" and "Windows Vista".

However, unlike "Windows XP" and "Windows Vista", when you hover the mouse cursor over the newly-relocated "Show Desktop" button, all open Windows on the Desktop will become temporarily transparent, revealing how the desktop looks behind all of the open Windows. This new feature is called

"Peek at the Desktop". It lets you see the Desktop without moving or re-sizing open Windows that are currently on the Desktop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"PEEK AT AN OPEN FILE ON THE DESKTOP"

 

When you hover your mouse cursor over any "Task button" on the "Taskbar" that represents an open Window, a small image of the Window will pop up to show you what is inside the actual Window. If a "Task button" represents multiple Windows, then small images of all of the currently open Windows will pop up side-by-side.

See

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Preview-an-open-window-on-the-desktop-using-Aero-Peek

for details.

 

 

 

 

 

MAKING "WINDOWS 7" LOOK LIKE "XP" OR "VISTA"

 

STEPS TO PLACATE A SCREAMING COMPUTER "LUDDITE" WHO IS SCREAMING THAT HE OR SHE CANNOT STAND "WINDOWS 7":

 

 

STEP 1:

To make Windows 7 display a single column "Start Menu", download "csmenu", a free software application that you can obtain from

http://www.csmenu.com

 

 

 

STEP 2:

Follow the steps at

http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-7/make-the-windows-7-taskbar-work-more-like-windows-xp-or-vista/

 

 

 

STEP 3:

 

Perform a right mouse click on the Windows "Desktop".

Click on "Personalize" on the popup context menu.

Pick the "Windows Classic" theme.

 

 

Steps 2 and 3 are also described in

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/2303791/how_to_make_windows_7_look_more_like.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

"PINNING" AND "JUMP LISTS"

 

By default "Windows 7" has no "Quick Launch" bar: It has been replaced by "pinning" to the Taskbar.

"Pinning" means that you can put a menu-ed button for any executable application program onto either the "Taskbar" or the top-most section of the left side of the "Start Menu".

"Pinning" to the topmost section of the left side of the "Start Menu" is available in "Windows XP" and "Windows Vista" when the regular (not classic) Start Menu is selected in "Windows XP" and "Windows Vista").

"Pinning" to the Taskbar is new to "Windows 7". You cannot pin executable application programs to the Taskbar in "Windows XP" and "Windows Vista".

 

(If you absolutely have to have a "Quick Launch" toolbar, you can get it back. See

http://www.mydigitallife.info/2009/01/14/how-to-enable-or-disable-quick-launch-bar-toolbar-in-windows-7/

However, give "Windows 7" a chance. Do not add the "Quick Launch" bar back into the "taskbar" of "Windows 7". Try out "pinning" shortcut icons to the taskbar instead. You will be glad that you tried it out !)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"JUMP LISTS"

 

"Jump lists" are a new feature in "Windows 7".

"Jump lists" are not available in "Windows XP" or "Windows Vista".

"Jump lists" consist of menu-ed shortcuts to data files and task/actions that are related to the executable applicable program that a pinned icon represents.

 

 

"Jump lists" are associated with "pinned" icons for "pinned icons" on the "Task Bar" and "pinned icons" on the "Start Menu":

 

 

"Jump lists" of icons pinned to the "Task Bar":

 

When you right-click on a application program icon that is "pinned" to the Taskbar,

"jump lists" are the items that are located above the bottom-most grayish line on the pop-up utility menu that is displayed

 

AND

 

"Jump lists" of icons pinned to the "Start Menu":

When you do a "Pin to Start Menu" on a program application (or a shortcut to a program application), then the same jump list can be accessed by hovering the mouse cursor over right-pointing triangle (guillemet) to the right of the "pinned" icon that is located above "All Programs" in the left column of the "Start Menu".

 

Different jump lists have different sections, depending on what is appropriate:

See:

http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/window-on-windows/?p=1059

 

Many jump lists have a "Pinned" section, a "Recent" section, and a "Tasks" section.

The "Pinned" section consist of shortcuts to pertinent data documents that you have added to the "pinned" icon.

 

In the following example, "Microsoft Word 2010 beta" is pinned to the task bar:

 

 

 

*

When you hover your mouse cursor over it, you see representations of all open windows, if any that the "pinned" icon represents ("Peek at Open Window" of "Aero Peek")

 

When you click on it with the left mouse button, "Microsoft Word.." starts up.

 

If only one open Window of "Microsoft Word" exists and you use your left mouse button to click on the pinned icon, the existing open Window of "Microsoft Word" will minimize. When you click on the pinned icon again, the open Window of "Microsoft Word" will restore.

 

If more than one open Window of "Microsoft Word" exists and you use your left mouse button to click on the pinned icon, nothing will happen.

 

If you use your right mouse button to click on the pinned icon for "Microsoft Word", then the "jump list" for "Microsoft Word" will be displayed:

 

 

Notice that it has a "Pinned" section and a "Recent" section.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"PINNING" EXECUTABLE PROGRAMS:

 

You can "pin" executable application programs (or shortcuts to executable application programs) to either the "Taskbar" or the top-most section of the left side of the "Start Menu".

 

When you "pin" an executable application program to the "Task Bar", a permanent shortcut icon appears in the "Task Bar" to the right of the "Start Menu".

 

When you "pin" an executable application program to the "Start Menu", a permanent shortcut icon appears in the top-most section of the left column of the "Start Menu" above "All Programs".

 

 

There are two ways to pin an executable application program (or a shortcut to an executable application) to the "Taskbar" and/or the "Start Menu" in "Windows 7":

 

Method 1:

Drag the executable application (or a shortcut to the executable program) to the "Taskbar" or the "Start button".

 

Method 2:

Right click on the executable application (or a shortcut to the executable program) and select "Pin to Taskbar" or "Pin to Start Menu" from the pop-up utility menu.

 

 

 

 

 

ADDING (SHORTCUTS TO) DATA FILES TO "JUMP LISTS"

 

You can create a shortcut for a data file on the left side of the Start Menu by dragging the data file to the "Start Menu".

 

In contrast, you cannot place a shortcut for a data file onto the Taskbar directly.

 

 

When you try to drag a data file (or a shortcut to a data file) to the "taskbar", it gets added to the "Jump List" of the executable program, if the executable problem is already "pinned" to the Task Bar.  For example, if you drag a Microsoft Word .doc document file to the "Taskbar", the pop-up "Tooltip" will say "Pin to Microsoft Office Word 2007" and the .doc document will now show up in the "Pinned" section of the jump list  for the pinned "Microsoft Office Word 2007" icon.

 

In other words, "Pinned to Microsoft Office Word 2007" means "added to the Pinned section of the jump list of Microsoft Office Word 2007".

 

If you drag a data file (or a shortcut to a data file) to the "taskbar" and the appropriate executable program is not already pinned to the "taskbar", two things occur:

 

A shortcut to the executable program is pinned to the the "taskbar"

and

a shortcut to the the data file is added to the jump list of the executable program.

If the related executable application program has already been "pinned" to the "Start Menu", the data file gets added to the jump list of the pinned application program icon on the "Start Menu" at the same time.

 

 

 

 

 

ADDING FAVORITES AND "INTERNET SHORTCUTS" TO "JUMP LISTS"

 

You can create an Internet Explorer "favorite" or an "Internet shortcut" on the left side of the Start Menu by dragging the data file to the "Start Menu".

 

In contrast, you cannot place an Internet Explorer "favorite" or an "Internet shortcut"  onto the Taskbar directly.

 

 

When you try to drag an Internet Explorer "favorite" or an "Internet shortcut"  to the "taskbar", it gets added to the "Jump List" of the executable program, if the executable problem is already "pinned" to the Task Bar.  For example, if you drag an "Internet shortcut" to  the "Taskbar", the pop-up "Tooltip" will say "Pin to Internet Explorer" and the "Internet shortcut" will now show up in the "Pinned" section of the jump list  for the pinned "Internet Explorer" icon.

 

In other words, "Pinned to Internet Explorer" means "added to the Pinned section of the jump list of "Internet Explorer".

 

If you drag a data file (or a shortcut to a data file) to the "taskbar" and the appropriate executable program is not already pinned to the "taskbar", two things occur:

 

A shortcut to the executable program is pinned to the the "taskbar"

and

a shortcut to the the data file is added to the jump list of the executable program.

If the related executable application program has already been "pinned" to the "Start Menu", the data file gets added to the jump list of the pinned application program icon on the "Start Menu" at the same time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USING "PINNED" APPLICATION PROGRAM ICONS

 

For any "pinned" icon on the taskbar, it persists there even after you close the application window that is associated with it.

 

For any "pinned" icon on the taskbar, when you have an active window of it, it is shown as being inside a white square.

 

For any "pinned" icon on the taskbar, when you have a non-active or minimized window of it, it is shown as being inside a gray square.

 

If there is already one window opened by a "pinned" icon, to open an additional Window, you can do one of two things:

Hold down the shift key and click on the "pinned" icon.

Right click on the "pinned" icon and click on the pop-up utility menu that is the name of the program that the "pinned" icon represents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MAKING "WINDOWS 7" LOG IN AUTOMATICALLY

 

Most users of home computers do not want to have to log in with their user names and passwords every time that they power up their Windows 7 computers.

Here is how you can make Windows 7 log you in automatically:

See

http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-vista/make-windows-vista-log-on-automatically/

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOMEGROUPS

 

"Homegroups" are a new way of sharing files and folders.

 

The best description of a "homegroup" is at

http://www.win7news.net/?id=12:

 

<Start of quote>

 

During the setup of Windows 7, you're asked to select your computer's location; that is, are you on a home, work or public network? Your settings will be configured differently, based on your choice. It's assumed that within a home, there is more trust, so the default is to make it easier to share resources within the local network. If you want to participate in a HomeGroup, you must select "Home" as the location. When you make that selection, your computer will automatically start looking for other Windows 7 computers on the network. If you've already created a HomeGroup on your network, you'll have the option to join it. If not, you can create one.

 

You can also join or create a HomeGroup at a later time, through the Network and Sharing Center. Just click "Choose homegroup and sharing options" under the "Change your network settings" section. For security, the HomeGroup is password protected. Windows generates a secure password consisting of alpha and numeric characters, and that password has to be entered into each computer that joins the HomeGroup. You can change the password through the HomeGroup applet in Control Panel.

 

<End of quote>

 

"Homegroups" only work for Windows 7 computers.

 

"Windows XP", "Windows Vista" and "Windows 2000" computers cannot see "homegroups".

 

"IP version 6" support service needed for "homegroups" sharing between Windows 7 computers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A "Windows 7" computer can only belong to one homegroup:

See

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Why-can-t-I-join-a-homegroup

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To create a new homegroup, if one does not already exists on your home network

OR

to join an existing homegroup, that has been already been created by another "Windows 7" computer on your home network:

 

Click on the Windows "Start" button.

Type in

    homegroup

      in the Search box.

Press the <Enter> key of your computer's keyboard.

Check off which items, if any, you want to share on your Windows 7 computer.

Click on the "Save Changes" button.

 

The items that you share AND the items that are shared by the other homegroup participating computers on your home network will now show up under the "Homegroup" section of "Windows Explorer".

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRADITIONAL SHARED FOLDERS

 

"TCP/IP NetBIOS Helper" service must be running for Windows 7 client to "see" shares from earlier versions of Windows.

 

"TCP/IP NetBIOS Helper" service does not need to be running on the host Windows Vista or Windows XP computers for earlier versions

 

of Windows on clients to see traditional "shares" in "Windows 7".

 

 

To make a traditional shared folder that all other Windows 7 and earlier versions of Windows can "see", create or pick a regular folder in

 

the Windows 7 computer. Then right click on the folder. Click on "Share with" on the utility pop-up menu. Then select "Specific

 

people..". Then select the Everyone group. Then click on the Okay button.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"SYSTEM RESERVED" PARTITION

 

If you install Windows 7 into a blank, un-partitioned hard drive, you will end up with two partitions:

a "System Reserved" partition and a regular NTFS partition.

 

If you create an NTFS partition with "GParted" from the "Parted Magic" LiveCD prior to installing Windows 7, then a "System Reserved" partition will not be created by the installation process of "Windows 7".

 

A "in-place upgrade" from "Windows Vista" to "Windows 7" only creates one hard drive partition and a "System Reserved" partition is not created.

 

 

Strategies for not letting "Windows 7" install a "System Reserved" partition:

http://www.mydigitallife.info/2009/08/20/hack-to-remove-100-mb-system-reserved-partition-when-installing-windows-7/

and

http://www.persian-forums.com/blogs/shahram/remove-100mb-system-reserved-partition-installing-windows-7-145/

 

Strategies for deleting the "System Restore" partition after "Windows 7" installs one:

http://www.sevenforums.com/general-discussion/31456-removing-100mb-system-partition-no-re-install-needed.html

and

http://forums.mydigitallife.info/showthread.php?t=9661